how to talk to a parent with dementia

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If you are a caretaker or family member of someone with dementia, communication is key. People with dementia often have trouble communicating their thoughts and feelings because they may forget what they want to say mid-sentence, become agitated when frustrated, or not know the right words to use. At Kinkaid, we understand the importance of communication and offer the following guide on how to talk to a parent with dementia.

 

What Should You Not Say to Someone with Dementia?

 

There are a few cardinal rules regarding what you should not say to a person with dementia, including:

 

    • Try not to argue with a parent experiencing dementia. Telling them to calm down and raising your voice can bring unwanted energy into the situation, and only make them agitated.
    • Avoid correcting a person with dementia. They can mix up their words or get facts wrong. When they do, correcting them can lead to frustration and confusion.
    • When speaking to someone with dementia, always treat them as an equal. Nobody likes to feel infantilized, so skip the baby talk.
    • Questions like “What did you have for breakfast?” or “How are you feeling today?” can be frustrating for a person with dementia who cannot always remember the answer. Instead, focus on the present moment and what they are currently engaged in.
    • Speaking about death can be frightful for anyone. Bringing up friends who have passed away can lead to agitation.
    • Try not to tell them to stop repeating themselves. People experiencing memory loss do not recognize that they are repeating conversations, so this can seem like you are putting them down for no reason.
    • Similarly, do not ask them if they remember something. This can be a frustrating experience – they can recognize that they should remember but are incapable of doing so.

 

 

These guidelines can help to alleviate much of the frustration and arguments in speaking with a parent with dementia. Remember that their cognitive challenges are often just as frustrating for them as they are for you and try to show compassion for their position. Reducing conflict and arguments with a parent with dementia improves their quality of life as well as your own.

 

How to Talk to a Parent with Dementia

As there are things that you should not say to a person with dementia, there are also things that you should do when talking to them.

 

This includes:

 

    • Sticking to open-ended questions that give them more room to answer, like “How was your day?”
    • Being aware of your tone—it should always be gentle and patient. People with dementia often match the energy of other people in the room, so remaining calm can help them feel at ease.
    • Using short, simple words and sentences and speaking slowly and distinctively.
    • Not being afraid of silence with a person experiencing dementia. They may have trouble articulating their thoughts or might need time to think about what you have said without feeling rushed or pressured into responding right away.

 

Behaving in this manner allows people with dementia to be active participants in a conversation, minimizes the amount of time in frustrating exchanges, and can help them to adjust to their recent changes in mental health.

 

It is often beneficial to play along when people with dementia are discussing things in the past that are no longer true or are repeating things they have said multiple times already. Pointing out the inconsistencies in their speech only draws attention to their impairment and can cause them to grow frustrated. A few key guidelines include:

 

    • If a person with dementia repeats themselves, act as though they are saying it for the first time. This could include answering the same question several times over.
    • If they get their facts mixed up or are unclear about something they have said, just go with the flow and pretend you understand what they are saying.
    • Instead of asking if they remember something, speak about your memories together in more general terms without expecting a response one way or another.
    • Being agreeable if they talk about their deceased loved ones as if they are alive or are in the room with them. Ask them questions that lead them to continue believing their loved one is alive.

 

 

This should not be viewed as an act of deception. Rather, you are helping them to manage the frustration of cognitive decline that they have no control over.

 

Should You Tell a Person with Dementia That They Have Dementia?

Telling someone that they have dementia can be difficult, but it is often something that most people want to know, especially at early onset when more can be done to treat the disease. It is a good idea for their health care professional and their family to have that discussion with them if they want to know.

When you tell them, be sure to use gentle, understanding language and avoid making them feel like they are being blamed or that they are a victim. Explain what dementia is in clear, simple terms and assure them that there are treatments available that can help improve their quality of life.

 

As a general guideline, several things will need to be explained:

 

    • An explanation as to why the symptoms are occurring.
    • A discussion of the form of dementia, in terms that are appropriate to the person’s level of understanding.
    • Any possible treatment for symptoms.
    • Specialized services and support programs that are available for people with dementia.

 

 

On the other hand, the rights of individuals who don’t want to know they have dementia should be respected. Doctors and caregivers should seek to understand their patients’ preferences and not make it routine to always disclose the condition to them. Instead, they should act appropriately according to their patient’s choices.

 

Can Dementia Get Worse Suddenly?

Dementia that worsens suddenly is known as a rapid decline. There are several reasons why this happens, including physical changes to the brain that get progressively worse over time.

That means that it can also get worse suddenly, depending on the type of dementia, the individual and how far the condition has progressed. However, once a certain threshold of progression is reached, there is almost always a rapid decline.

In addition, there is some evidence that hospital stays, particularly if they involve surgery, can cause a condition known as hospital delirium in patients over seventy. The American Geriatrics Society estimates that hospital delirium affects about a third of these patients, causing delirium or rapid worsening of existing delirium.

What to Do if You Suspect Your Loved One Has Dementia?

There are several ways that you can get help if you suspect your loved one has dementia.

One way is to discuss changes with your loved one about observed cognitive changes. Discuss seeing a doctor as soon as possible. Also, talk about the problem of driving and that they should always have their ID on them.

 

Another way is to see a doctor and have them do a medical assessment, which is a series of tests to diagnose the condition. This is the only way to determine the cause of cognitive challenges and provide accurate treatment.

 

Another Issue: A Parent with Dementia Refuses Help

A parent with dementia that is in denial may refuse help. A way you can help when this happens is to have a family meeting. A parent with dementia may be more open to getting help if there is consensus among the family that something is wrong, rather than a single person advising them to seek help.

During the get-together, start planning and gathering documents like the Estate Plan, Health Care Directive, and the Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care.

 

Remember, people with dementia have the right to refuse medical care if they demonstrate they have adequate mental capacity.

 

Kinkaid Offers Specialized Care Options for Dementia

 

Kinkaid offers in-home dementia and Alzheimer’s care throughout the Los Angeles area. You should consider at-home treatment options for dementia if your loved one is experiencing any of the following symptoms:

 

    • Memory loss
    • Change in thinking skills
    • Difficulty focusing
    • Low attention span
    • Lack of reasoning skills

 

Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the disease, but Kinkaid Private Care can provide several specialized care options. The compassionate and professional in-home care providers at Kinkaid know how to care for a parent with dementia and can guarantee your loved one the comfort of remaining in his or her home during treatment.

We also prioritize communication with seniors and their families so that they receive everything they need in an effective and timely manner.

If you would like more information about how to talk to a parent with dementia or our specialized in-home care, please visit our website or call us at (866) 337-4596. During the consult, we can go over the many options available and determine the best course of action for your loved one.

 FAQs

What are some coping strategies for dementia?

It is important to take care of your physical and mental health by doing activities that you enjoy, staying active, getting enough rest and eating nutritious meals.

How do you calm a parent with dementia?

It is important to remain calm, patient and supportive of your parent during periods of agitation. Try to identify the trigger and use other activites to distract away from the issue like calming music, gentle talk or art therapy.

What are signs that dementia is getting worse?

Signs of worsening dementia include increased confusion and/or memory loss, needing more assistance with daily tasks like bathing and grooming and significant personality changes. Connect with one of our nurse case managers today to learn how you can keep your loved on safe at home.

Is it best to keep a dementia patient at home?

In most cases, it is possible to keep a dementia patient home and ensure their safety if you have the right team in place. Connect with one of our nurse case managers today to discuss the benefits of keeping your loved one at home!

 

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man with alzheimer's disease receiving care at home

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” column_margin=”default” column_direction=”default” column_direction_tablet=”default” column_direction_phone=”default” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” row_border_radius=”none” row_border_radius_applies=”bg” overlay_strength=”0.3″ gradient_direction=”left_to_right” shape_divider_position=”bottom” bg_image_animation=”none”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_tablet=”inherit” column_padding_phone=”inherit” column_padding_position=”all” column_element_spacing=”default” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” column_link_target=”_self” gradient_direction=”left_to_right” overlay_strength=”0.3″ width=”1/1″ tablet_width_inherit=”default” tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” bg_image_animation=”none” border_type=”simple” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]If your loved one has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, you should seek care so he or she can live a comfortable lifestyle and receive the treatment he or she needs for this complicated disease. And if you live in Los Angeles, there are many care options across the metro area. 

However, to receive the best and most comfortable care, we recommend looking into in-home nursing care. In this article, we will discuss what Alzheimer’s care is, why you should look into home care, and how Kinkaid can help you find home care in Los Angeles.

What is Alzheimer’s Care?

Alzheimer’s care involves caring for the every-day needs of someone with Alzheimer’s disease. While Alzheimer’s can have many different symptoms and cases can range in severity, care for this disease typically involves the following, among other aspects:

  • Working with patients to maintain and improve daily routines
  • Ensuring patients are always safe and do not wander off
  • Ensuring patients maintain a healthy lifestyle, including a healthy diet and exercise
  • Administering medications in an appropriate and timely manner
  • Coordinating family visits

Again, cases range in severity, so the level and specific requirements of care will vary depending on the goals and needs of patients and their families.

Why Receive Alzheimer’s Care at Home in Los Angeles?

Receiving Alzheimer’s care at home has many advantages, especially in Los Angeles. The following are a few of these advantages:

  • Better Care: Care is always better when it is personalized and private. With in-home care, the caregivers focus solely on you and your loved one, so you receive more attention and an overall better experience.

  • Better Relationships with Caregivers: By receiving care at home, you and your loved one will be able to build a stronger relationship with the caregivers because the caregivers will be focused solely on you and your family. This contrasts a care facility, where caregivers must attend to numerous patients at once.

  • Increased Comfort & Less Stress: Receiving care in the comfort of your home is always better than receiving care at a facility. Your loved one will be more comfortable if he or she wakes up every morning in familiar surroundings and near family. One of the most common symptoms of Alzheimer’s is the inability to cope with new things. So, allowing your loved one to receive treatment at home will eliminate the stress of having to move to an unfamiliar place.

  • Better for the Family: Visiting a care facility can be stressful and uncomfortable. By receiving care at home, your loved one can receive visitors at any time of the day and in the comfort of your family home. It is much easier and more relaxing to visit the grandparents in the privacy of their home.

  • Avoid the Stress of Traveling in LA: If you currently live close to your loved one with Alzheimer’s, the last thing you want to do is move your loved one to a facility that requires navigating through Los Angeles traffic to get to. Allowing your loved one to receive care at home ensures you and your family will not have to travel far to visit.

Receive Alzheimer’s Care at Home in Los Angeles with Kinkaid:

If you or your loved one is in need of Alzheimer’s or dementia care, please reach out to us to see how we can help. Kinkaid Private Nursing Care offers premium in-home services to patients looking for the best and most intensive care on the market. We only take on a few clients at a time, so we always provide specialized care to meet the needs of each client.

For more information, please visit our homepage and learn about the array of services we provide. These services include at-home Alzheimer’s and dementia care, in-home nursing care, and the coordination of a variety of at-home medical services in the Los Angeles area, as well as home detox services all over the state of California. We also offer at-home Covid-19 testing.



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dementia care california

Los Angeles | Orange County | San Diego | Bay Area

Dementia is complicated, so finding the best care for your loved one can be challenging. This article aims to give you a few tips to help you find the right care. But first, we need to define dementia, as the term is commonly misunderstood.

What Is Dementia?

Dementia is not a specific disease. Rather, it is an umbrella term that describes various symptoms related to memory loss. The Mayo Clinic associates the following symptoms with dementia:

  • Memory loss
  • Change in one’s thinking skills
  • Lack of reasoning skills and judgement
  • Difficulty focusing on various tasks
  • Lower attention span
  • Decline in language and communication skills

Many people associate Alzheimer’s with dementia, but they are not the same thing. While dementia is an umbrella term, Alzheimer’s is a specific disease and accounts for a majority of dementia cases in the United States. Check out our article on the differences between Alzheimer’s and Dementia for more information.

Finding The Best Dementia Care:

Because dementia can take on many forms, finding the right care can be challenging. The following are a few tips for ensuring you get the right care for your loved one:

  • Understand Your Case Of Dementia: Before proceeding with anything, you must understand what you are dealing with. As noted earlier, dementia can take on many forms and cause a variety of symptoms, and no two cases of dementia are exactly alike. Because of this, you must fully understand what you are dealing with before you proceed with caregiving options.
  • Find Caregivers Who Focus On California: Many states have different regulations for caring for various illnesses, so it can be helpful to find a provider that is an expert in treating patients in California.
  • Stick With A Small Company: Nobody likes dealing with the bureaucracy of a large company, especially for a topic as important as caring for your loved ones. Small companies may not have the same prestige as larger providers, but they are just as effective and usually much easier to work with.
  • Do Your Research: Take your time to do your research to ensure you hire the best caregivers for the job. Call numerous providers, ask the tough questions, and create a pro/con list for each option. Try to involve your family in the process as well if possible.

Get The Home Care You Need with Kinkaid:

If you or your loved one is in need of dementia care California, please reach out to us to see how we can help. Kinkaid Private Nursing Care offers premium in-home services to patients looking for the best and most intensive care on the market. We only take on a few clients at a time, so we always provide specialized care to meet the needs of each client.

For more information, please visit our homepage and learn about the array of services we provide. These services include at-home dementia care, in-home nursing care, and the coordination of a variety of at-home medical services in the Los Angeles area, as well as home detox services all over the state of California. We also offer at-home Covid-19 testing.

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Tips For Treating Alzheimer’s

Los Angeles | Orange County | San Diego | Bay Area

Treating Alzheimer’s disease can be challenging and stressful, but we aim to provide you with a few tips to help you get on the right track. When caring for someone with this disease, keep in mind the following five tips:

Prepare Thoroughly:

As you begin caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, it is crucial to develop an in-depth plan of what your care will look like. Caring for this disease can be exhausting and time-consuming, so it is important to have a plan. While creating a plan, try to do the following:

  • Do your research to make sure you know what to expect.
  • Brainstorm all possible scenarios so you are ready for anything.
  • Develop a plan that includes a daily routine (more on this below) and a trusted support network. Caring for Alzheimer’s can be difficult, so having a support network is crucial.
  • Figure out what resources you will need and how you will get them.

Develop A Daily Routine:

As noted above, developing a daily routine is crucial for any Alzheimer’s caregiving plan. Having a daily routine will not only make your life easier by providing you with some consistency and ease, but it will also keep your Alzheimer’s patient comfortable by giving him or her a sense of structure. Also, a daily routine will make it easier for someone with memory loss to understand what is going on throughout the day.

Keep The Patient Comfortable:

Speaking of comfort, as a caregiver, you should do everything you can to keep your loved one comfortable. Because of the memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s, your loved one may start feeling a sense of fear or confusion. Keeping him or her as comfortable as possible will help alleviate these feelings.

Here are three tips for keeping an Alzheimer’s patient comfortable:

  • Always be kind and show that you are understanding of the patient’s situation. Alzheimer’s patients know they have the disease and may think they are a burden. Make sure they know they are not a burden and that you understand their situation.
  • Remind them of their daily routine throughout the day. This will help them remember what they are supposed to do and may reduce their sense of confusion.
  • Put up signs around the house to remind them of various things when appropriate. This is just another tactic to make their lives a bit easier.

Always Have An Open Mind:

Alzheimer’s is a complicated disease that still has many unknowns, and no two cases of Alzheimer’s are exactly alike. Because of this, it is important to keep an open mind throughout the caregiving process. Be prepared for anything and don’t be surprised when some things don’t go as planned.

Get Professional Help With At-Home Alzheimer’s Care:

Because of the stress and challenges that come with caring for Alzheimer’s, seeking outside help is often the best way to care for your loved one.

If you or your loved one is in need of Alzheimer’s care, please reach out to us to see how we can help. Kinkaid Private Nursing Care offers premium in-home services to patients looking for the best and most intensive care on the market. We only take on a few clients at a time, so we always provide specialized care to meet the needs of each client.

For more information, please visit our homepage and learn about the array of services we provide. These services include at-home Alzheimer’s care, in-home nursing care, and the coordination of a variety of at-home medical services in the Los Angeles area, as well as home detox services all over the state of California. We also offer at-home Covid-19 testing.

Stay in the Know

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive an in-depth article about Dementia Care from our nurse.
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difference between alzheimer's and dementia

Los Angeles | Orange County | San Diego | Bay Area

Alzheimer’s and Dementia are two of the most common conditions affecting senior citizens today. And while these terms are constantly thrown around and used to describe memory-related diseases in the elderly, understanding the difference between the two is crucial for ensuring you obtain the right care for yourself or your loved ones. 

So What’s the Difference Between Alzheimer’s and Dementia?

Simply put, dementia is an umbrella term used to describe various memory-loss-related symptoms. It is not a specific disease. According to the Mayo Clinic, the following are common symptoms associated with dementia: 

  • Memory loss
  • Change in thinking skills
  • Lack of judgement and reasoning skills
  • Difficulty focusing
  • Low attention span
  • Decline in language and communication skills

Moreover, there are many causes and types of dementia, according to the Mayo Clinic, including: 

  • Lewy body dementia
  • Frontotemporal dementia
  • Vascular dementia
  • Parkinson’s disease dementia
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
  • Huntington’s disease

Meanwhile, Alzheimer’s disease, unlike “Dementia,” is a specific disease and is the most common and well-known form of dementia. The most common symptom of Alzheimer’s is severe memory loss, but the disease comes with other symptoms as well. Check out the Alzheimer’s Association to learn more about this disease and some of its early warning signs. 

Caring For Alzheimer’s and Dementia:

Alzheimer’s and dementia are serious, so it is important that you ensure you or your loved ones receive high-quality care. After all, memory loss is scary and can lead to a previously fully-functioning individual losing his or her independence.

While many providers offer treatment in this category, do your research to ensure you find the right provider for your situation. Also, as treatment has become more advanced, it is possible to receive all the care you need from the comfort of your home. We strongly recommend looking into in-home nursing and memory care for you or your loved one, as it provides the treatment you need without the stress of staying or living outside your comfort zone. 

Get The Home Care You Need with Kinkaid:

If you or your loved one is in need of Alzheimer’s or dementia care, please reach out to us to see how we can help. Kinkaid Private Nursing Care offers premium in-home services to patients looking for the best and most intensive care on the market. We only take on a few clients at a time, so we always provide specialized care to meet the needs of each client.

For more information, please visit our homepage and learn about the array of services we provide. These services include at-home Alzheimer’s and dementia care, in-home nursing care, and the coordination of a variety of at-home medical services in the Los Angeles area, as well as home detox services all over the state of California. We also offer at-home Covid-19 testing.

 

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